edit etc fstab in single user mode

We will need to switch to single user mode so login as root and type: # shutdown now Press Enter to get the default shell We will need to unmount the partitions that will be journaled in our example /usr and /var: # umount /usr /var Load the module required for journaling: # gjournal load Now use your notes to determine which partition will be used for each journal In our example /usr Our mission is to put the power of computing and digital making into the hands of people all over the world We do this so that more people are able to harness the power of computing and digital technologies for work to solve problems that matter to them and to express themselves creatively

how to disable the internal hard drive

13 12 2016In Terminal in your admin account edit the '/etc/fstab' use 'vifs' as root (a fstab file will be created if it doesn't exist) sudo vifs Copy the line from the test file paste it in to the Terminal that is editing fstab - I'm uncertain if your editor will be 'vi' or 'nano' you will have to search for help on using these if it says 'GNU nano' at the top hit crtl +x Y hit return to

22 08 2014Can' edit fstab in rescue mode: amolina: Linux - Newbie: 2: 06-23-2008 05:04 AM: FC7 cannot edit /etc/fstab in single mode: leiw: Linux - Newbie: 3: 12-21-2007 04:23 AM: help in single user mode - cannot write fstab: Shady_Creeper: Slackware: 2: 02-14-2007 09:15 AM: cannot edit fstab in SELinux active mode: eldraque: Fedora: 1: 01-19-2006 03:38

This can also be performed in single user mode or from the install kernel Full Disk Encryption Much like RAID full disk encryption in OpenBSD is handled by the softraid(4) subsystem and bioctl(8) command This section covers installing OpenBSD to a single encrypted disk and

To permanently disable fsck check on a hard disk partition you need to edit the /etc/fstab file There are two values you are looking for: dump and pass Dump is used to determine whether the partition needs to be dumped and Pass is used to determine the order in which the partitions need to be checked Setting both to 0 will tell fsck to skip checking the partitions So open /etc/fstab

If replacing a failed drive you will probably be in single user mode with a read only drive and may want to match the previous UUID so it boots seamlessly: mkfs ext4 -L disk2 -U uuid /dev/sdb1 where the the UUID is obtained by looking in /etc/fstab This will allow the replacement drive to mount just as if it was the old drive it is replacing

How to Mount and Unmount File Systems in Linux

To do so open the /etc/fstab file with your text editor: sudo nano /etc/fstab Add the following line to the file replacing remote server:/dir with the NFS server IP address or hostname and the exported directory: /etc/fstab # file system dir type options dump pass remote server:/dir /media/nfs nfs defaults 0 0 Mount the NFS share by running the following command: sudo mount

23 04 2011nano /etc/fstab should open the file for editing No need for sudo because you are superuser in recovery already Adv Reply April 21st 2011 #3 Bolinga View Profile View Forum Posts Private Message First Cup of Ubuntu Join Date Apr 2011 Beans 8 Re: edit fstab in recovery shell I know I have tried several times but when I exit it again its asks if I want to save is say yes But then it

# - requires given linux commands to be executed with root privileges either directly as a root user or by use of sudo command $ - requires given linux commands to be executed as a regular non-privileged user Video Example SUBSCRIBE TO NEWSLETTER Subscribe to Linux Career NEWSLETTER and receive latest Linux news jobs career advice and tutorials Detecting USB hard drive After you plug in

Enter Single-User Mode As you'll need to remount the /home filesystem you make sure that no other users or processes are using it by first entering single-user mode from the console If you are certain that you're the only user on the system you might be able to skip this step Entering single-user mode automatically logs off all users and stops cron jobs so wait until after hours to do in

23 04 2011nano /etc/fstab should open the file for editing No need for sudo because you are superuser in recovery already Adv Reply April 21st 2011 #3 Bolinga View Profile View Forum Posts Private Message First Cup of Ubuntu Join Date Apr 2011 Beans 8 Re: edit fstab in recovery shell I know I have tried several times but when I exit it again its asks if I want to save is say yes But then it

The /etc/fstab mount option nofail may be used to have fsck skip non-existing devices fsck also skips non-existing devices that have the special filesystem type auto -C [fd] Display completion/progress bars for those filesystem checkers (currently only for ext2 and ext3) which support them Fsck will manage the filesystem checkers so that only one of them displays a progress bar at a time

cp /etc/fstab ls -l We were able to change directory into the new file system and we successfully made a copy of the /etc/fstab file It's working! If we use mount to list the mounted file systems but restrict its output to ext4 file systems using the -t (type) option we'll see that there are now two mounted ext4 file systems mount -t

14 02 2007After messing up with the /etc/fstab file i am only allowed to boot in single user mode But the problem is although i mounted the whole filesystem as read-write through mount -a (or better mount -aw ) the fstab file cannot be still writen In fact no file can be written anymore I tried beforehand runninf fsck -p and the message was

How to Do Quota Disk Management

As far as you have you own system and if a single user then you can use any amount of space without any restriction Since Linux major use is the ability to support multiuser you may need to have some restriction in the amount of disk space the user takes up I am going to explain you how to manage disk quota in this document Enter single user mode This is the first step you got to do Enter

13 12 2016In Terminal in your admin account edit the '/etc/fstab' use 'vifs' as root (a fstab file will be created if it doesn't exist) sudo vifs Copy the line from the test file paste it in to the Terminal that is editing fstab - I'm uncertain if your editor will be 'vi' or 'nano' you will have to search for help on using these if it says 'GNU nano' at the top hit crtl +x Y hit return to

/etc/fstab file is used to mount disks You need to edit /etc/fstab and make new entry to mount the partitions automatically Edit /etc/fstab and append below line at end of file Change /dev/sdb with your disk name /dev/sdb /data ext4 defaults 0 0 Now run mount -a command to immediate mount all disk defined in /etc/fstab file

Edit /etc/fstab and set the root partition at ro for read-only Reboot into single user mode Run tunefs-l enable on / Reboot the system into normal mode Run mount-urw / and change the ro back to rw in /etc/fstab and reboot the system again Double-check the output from the mount to ensure that multilabel has been properly set on the root file system

03 06 2017EDIT: I have removed the line for rootfs from /etc/fstab file for ability to support boot from any device without changing any files At overlayroot installation initrd img was rebuild with warnings because of rootfs line lack in /etc/fstab file cryptsetup: WARNING: could not determine root device from /etc/fstab

As you know that /etc/fstab file is visible for all logged in user So mentioning user and password in /etc/fstab is not a good idea To overcome this issue just create a credential file in user's home directory and point that file in /etc/fstab like below # cd ~ # vim smbfile username=santosh [email protected] Save and close file # chmod

Edit /etc/sysconfig/selinux and set SELinux in enforcing mode: SELINUX=enforcing Restarting the server is probably the fastest way to apply this change 4 Firewall The following inbound TCP ports should be open on the Spacewalk server: 69: TFTP (PXE provisioning) 80: Spacewalk web interface 443: Spacewalk web interface (SSL) 4545: Spacewalk monitoring 5222: If you plan to push actions

23 04 2011nano /etc/fstab should open the file for editing No need for sudo because you are superuser in recovery already Adv Reply April 21st 2011 #3 Bolinga View Profile View Forum Posts Private Message First Cup of Ubuntu Join Date Apr 2011 Beans 8 Re: edit fstab in recovery shell I know I have tried several times but when I exit it again its asks if I want to save is say yes But then it

Edit /etc/fstab and /etc/exports to comment out references to /home/csf Reboot to single user and check that /home/csf is not mounted fsck –y /dev/sda2 # Go for another cup of coffee Sort out any problems not solved by fsck Requota home filesystem using commands: Edit /etc/fstab to re-enable /home/csf mount /home/csf /sbin/quotaon –p /home/csf # checks whether quotas are enabled /sbin

News

  • firebreak mhw
  • osha ergonomic etool
  • citric acid liquid
  • Silicon dioxide CAS 7631-86-9
  • Chlorine Bleach as a Disinfectant
  • Calcium Stearate
  • isopropyl alcohol sds chem-supply
  • mthfr folic acid
  • beginning sentence for class 2
  • wellness mama ritual prenatal
  • Which Form of Creatine is Most Effective
  • Sorbitan Esters Featured Excipient
  • reactant definition
  • basicity of amines
  • Buyer s Guide The best fibers
  • best candy for sore throat
  • European Union further restricts four phthalates
  • anhydrous potassium dihydrogen phosphate
  • Copyright © 2014. All rights reserved.
    ^ Back to Top